Wednesday, May 9, 2018

A Prayer to Santa Marta Dominidora


A Prayer to Santa Marta Dominadora
40 x 24 inches
dyed linen, vinyl, sequins, lace, cotton fabric, acrylic paint
2018

Monday, April 23, 2018

Right Here, Right Now: San Antonio at CAMH




OPENING RECEPTION THIS FRIDAY 4/27!!! Lisette Chavez and I are so honored to have our multimedia installation, ANGEL BABY included in this exhibition at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston! Join us! 
"Right Here, Right Now: San Antonio in the Brown Foundation Gallery at CAMH from April 28–August 5, 2018. Showcasing 19 artists and artist collaboratives, Right Here, Right Now: San Antonio includes sculpture, painting, photography, drawing, ceramics, textiles, performance, and installation by a multi-generational cohort of artists. The artworks brought together in Right Here, Right Now: San Antonio attest to the richness of the city’s creative community. Rather than attempting to provide a generalized exhibition, Right Here, Right Now: San Antonio instead looks to cross-generational dialogues around notions of materiality, identity, and performativity. From paintings and unique stitcheries to immersive video environments, ceramic sculpture, and live performances, CAMH is pleased to expand the geographic scope of this exhibition series with a presentation of artworks by San Antonio-based artists."
Albert Alvarez
Richard Armendariz
Julia Barbosa Landois
Christie Blizard
Sarah Castillo
Lisette Chavez
Adriana Corral
Ana Fernandez
Audrya Flores
John Hernandez
Diana Kersey
César Martinez
Michael Martínez
Martha Mood
Katie Pell
Chuck Ramirez
José Luis Rivera
Daniel Rios Rodriguez
Saintlorraine

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

ANGEL BABY at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

SHE'S BAAAACK!!!!




Lisette Chavez and I are excited to bring our multimedia installation, ANGEL BABY to Contemporary Arts Museum Houston as a part of Right Here, Right Now: San Antonio. This exhibition will include 19 artists from SATX and opens Friday, April 27th. The show runs through August 5th. It's an honor to be a part of this group representing our beautiful city! The FB event page is below.




Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Tejana

I am working with Texas bindweed (a native Texan flowering vine in the morning glory family) to create some jewelry meant to adorn my Tejana body and show reverence for the land of my birth.

Tex-Mex

Tejana

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Texas Bleeding Heart Vine


More experiments in organic art are happening in my studio. While I wait for some other plant matter to dry out, I am focusing on this mujer.

This Texas bleeding heart vine bloomed once and was never really happy again. It struggled for a couple of years and died last winter. I kept the remains and something powerful is emerging. More to come...

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Texas Bindweed

I have been gathering cuttings of vines native to Texas to use in a new series of work. Among my favorites, is Texas bindweed. It's in the morning glory family and produces tiny white blooms with red centers. I found this particular vine thriving in a concrete-asphalt seam.

As I explore my own identity as a Tejana, I am working with this vine to create a few pieces meant to be worn, to adorn. I'm interested in how our bodies are forever linked to the place of our birth as well as our ability to flourish in new and challenging environments. As I work with this plant and learn more about its characteristics, I am also examining my own body: a soft body, a large body, a strong body, a body that's housed another body, a fat body, a powerful body, a body that takes up space, a Tejana body, a body that creates, an aging body, an abused body, a loved body, a sexual body, a body that has survived, a living body, a woman's body.

Texas bindweed 
Convolvulus equitans


Click on the link below to learn more about Texas bindweed



Sunday, March 18, 2018

ILGWU Local 180





ILGWU Local 180
21 x 17 x 3 inches
fabric, lace, pins, paper
2018


In 1959, in San Antonio, Texas the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union - Local 180 organized a strike against the Tex-Son garment factory demanding a living wage increase. Strikers faced violent opposition at the hands of the Tex-Son Company and police. This included intimidation, physical force, and arrests. Union members, a majority of whom where Mexican-American women, used creative tactics to earn the support of San Antonio which was traditionally known for its anti-union sentiment. Some of these tactics were to fashion themselves in attire that was deemed “ladylike” and use rhetoric that was centered around their roles as mothers. 

San Antonio born Sophie Gonzales was instrumental in this garment strike and was the first Mexican-American woman organizer in the history of Texas for ILGWU. This strike, that lasted from 1959 to 1963, was the beginning of her 35 years of dedication to labor union organizing in Texas. This work pays homage to the tenacity of Gonzales and her sister strikers.